Just because…

Just because the leaves have fallen, the grass goes dormant and it’s getting cold doesn’t mean you can’t spruce up your annual pots!

There aren’t any “winter” flowers to add but you sure can display some beautiful winter greens in your pots!

What a warm welcome on a cold day!

There is quite the assortment of beautiful evergreens in varying shades of green to blue that will last until spring.  Add in branches, berries, pine cones and seed pods.  For added color you can include ribbons or lights!  It’s all up to your imagination, don’t let the winter doldrums limit you!

Holiday Pot

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evergreen-kenny

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Don’t want to brave the cold, then call on our team to get the job done for you! Just contact us here: Van Zelst, Inc.

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Late bloomers!

Even though the season is winding down, some plants are just winding up!  You can still get a great splash of color with the following fall blooming plants!

Anemone x hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’

From spring to fall you’ll be provided with a nice base of lush green leaves up to 18″ tall.  Then in September and October the real show begins.  These beautiful 1-2″ flowers will brighten up the fading fall landscape.  They are white or pink flowers, even double cultivars are available.  In bloom they are a striking 24-36″ tall.

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Aconitum arendsii, Monkshood

You don’t normally see a lot of blue in the landscape.  But plant this handsome specimen  and you get a 2-4′ tall blue showstopper at the end of the growing season.  It also is one of the more unique blooms out there, with it’s helmet like sepals.

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Aster ‘purple dome’

Purple dome is just one of many varieties of Fall Aster.  They come in a range of purple, pink, hot pink and white.  Plants are filled with small daisy like flowers that form a blanket of color!  Plants bloom in September and are from 18″-3′ tall!

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Some perennials just fade into the garden at the end of the growing season and some, like above, create show stopping flowers. But don’t forget there are also those perennials that have great fall color, here are just a few:

Amsonia hubrechtii, Blue Star

You might think that after this plant blooms in spring that’s all you’ll get from it.  But Amsonia produces excellent fall color as the temperatures cool down.  The leaves turn bright yellow to orange and quickly brighten up the garden.

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Geranium sanguineum

Geraniums bloom spring through summer and a few straggler flowers in the late fall.  But beautiful red fall foliage is what you should expect come late September and October!

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And round out your landscape with shrubs that hold there fruit/berries late in the season and through winter:

Callicarpa spp. Beautyberry

One of my favorites is Beautyberry.  Now this is a showstopper you don’t often see!  Purlple-Amethyst colored berries!

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Need help in your garden?  We can work together in the coming months to create a landscape with blooms all season long!  Just contact us here: Van Zelst, Inc.

 

 

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A gracious greeting.

Where does your home begin–at the front door?  The plantings? Or the curb?  Many homeowners pay great attention to their interior design and finishes, outdoor living areas, and plantings, yet seem to neglect the important first impression made by their driveway.

driveway

A stone or brick drive ties a polished environment together; extending the carefully selected finishes all the way to the street.  And with so many options available, including environmentally friendly permeable pavers that help manage rainwater, there’s no reason to live with a concrete or asphalt driveway cutting through your otherwise picturesque property.

Because we feel that this is an important consideration–especially in grand homes with sweeping drives and parking areas–we do the work ourselves.  Our in-house masons install pristine driveways and patios according to our landscape architects’ plans.  That way, we can ensure the work is consistent with the high standards set by the rest of the home.

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You can’t beat the heat, but these plants sure can!

Soaring temperatures are no fun for any living thing. Perennials are easy to grow no nonsense plants, that’s if you plant the right plant in the right spot!

Here’s our top 5 perennials that will beat the heat of summer!

Achillea ‘Moonshine’

achillea moonshine

Echinacea ‘Fatal Attraction’

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Nepeta ‘Little Titch’

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Perovskia atriciplifolia ‘Little Spire’

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Stachys ‘Pink Cotton Candy’

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Still don’t know what to put where? Then give us a call and our Architects and Designers will create the perfect garden for you!

 

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Be on the lookout for…

Viburnum leaf beetle could be the next nuisance insect in the same vain as Japanese beetles.  One of the most popular and easiest to grown shrubs is the Arrowwood Viburnum (Viburnum dentatum), which means it’s fairly easy to find one in almost every landscape.  The Viburnum leaf beetle larvae and adults will feast on the foliage of Viburnums; quickly defoliating it.  After several years of defoliation your viburnum can die.  The adult beetle will then lay it’s eggs on the stems to make it an easy perennial pest, year after year!

What to look for and how to get rid of this pesky pest! 

Once viburnums have dropped their leaves in fall, look for egg masses along the undersides of the twigs. Prune out and discard any damaged branches or twigs. Do not compost this debris for mulch.

Viburnum Leaf Beetle, egg masses on twig

Viburnum Leaf Beetle, egg masses on twig

In late spring and early summer, look for small holes that skeletonize the leaves between the veins. On the underside of the leaves, you might see tiny, yellow-brown caterpillars, some with spots. Destroy any damaged leaves that drop.

Viburnum Leaf Beetle Larvae

Viburnum Leaf Beetle Larvae

A few weeks after hatching, the larvae drop to the ground and burrow into the soil to pupate. In about six weeks, the adult beetles emerge, feed on the leaves and lay eggs to start the cycle all over again. The 1/4- to 3/8-inch long, golden-brown beetles look shiny in the sun.

Adult Viburnum Leaf Beetle

Adult Viburnum Leaf Beetle

Viburnum species that are:
Highly susceptible:

  • V. dentatum: Arrowwood viburnums
  • V. nudum:  Possum-haw, smooth witherod viburnum
  • V. opulus: European cranberrybush viburnum
  • V. opulus var. americana (syn. V. trilobum): American cranberrybush viburnum

Susceptible:

  • V. acerifolium: Mapleleaf viburnum
  • V. lantana: Wayfaring tree, Mohican viburnum
  • V. sargentii: Sargent viburnum

Moderately susceptible:

  • V. burkwoodii: Burkwood viburnum
  • V. carlcephalum: Carlcephalum viburnum
  • V. cassinoides: Witherod viburnum
  • V. lentago: Nannyberry viburnum
  • V. prunifolium: Black-haw viburnum
  • V. rhytidophylloides: Lantanaphyllum viburnum

Most resistant:

  • V. carlesii: Koreanspice viburnum
  • V. juddii: Judd viburnum
  • V. plicatum and V. plicatum var. tomentosu: Doublefile viburnum
  • V. rhytidophyllum: Leatherleaf viburnum
  • V. sieboldii: Siebold viburnum

Not sure what to do, then contact one of our professional horticulturists to help assess the problem.

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Small Spaces. Big Impact.

While we often showcase our larger landscape projects, we are just as skilled at creating glorious landscapes in smaller spaces. Many clients in the city and older, established neighborhoods have limited space–but that doesn’t mean they have to limit their imagination.

In a compact space, functionality and flow are paramount. Details stand out. And the whole garden must work together at a glance. But the foundations of good design, careful preparation and well-executed maintenance are the same, whether you have a tiny lot or acres of open space.

For example, in a smaller space, we’re likely to recommend long blooming perennials that make the most of the available footprint.  We bring shady spaces to life with the right plants and use of hardscape elements. An emphasis on architectural shapes, containers and vertical elements takes full advantage of the space available.  And carefully planned structures or stonework can support the way you entertain.

By looking at each space as a unique opportunity and applying solid landscaping principles, the Van Zelst team can create beautiful outdoor environments in the most unexpected places.

Bring on spring!

Extending the look and the season by adding containers throughout the landscape is a terrific way to accessorize–in a small space or as focal points within a sweeping environment.  Containers allow you to incorporate plants into the patio or near the home, add height and artistic appeal, and update the garden from season to season.

We can start by punctuating the landscape with bursts of color as early as Late March into April.  We use forced bulbs, branches, pansies, and other cold hardy annuals to welcome spring. Contact us now, Van Zelst Inc, to bring instant color to your yard!

 

 

Dormant pruning…

The snow has finally melted, maybe spring really is just around the corner!  Are you itching to get your hands dirty?  Well since we still have a few more cold days on the horizon, tilling the garden might be out for now but a good task to accomplish in the mean time is pruning. Most plants benefit from some sort of regular pruning and maintenance. The trick is to know when to prune. Most flowering and fruiting plants prefer to be pruned while they are dormant, in late winter through early spring. Spring blooming trees and shrubs, will start setting new buds as soon as the old buds have fallen. These will need to be pruned shortly after flowering.  A good rule of thumb is to prune summer and fall flowering trees and shrubs in the dormant season (late winter / early spring) and to prune spring flowering trees and shrubs soon after their flowers fade.

Pruning in early spring best solves certain problems, even on spring blooming plants. It is always good to remove dead and dying branches prior to new growth coming out in spring. This directs energy to healthier buds. Removal of a few crowded stems each year will open up the interior of the plant, providing better air circulation and light penetration.  Just use caution on spring flowering plants; only remove what is necessary to correct the problem.  You don’t want to remove those flower buds that will be blooming in the next few months or else you’ll have to wait another 12 to see those flowers!

Don’t have time to do this yourself?  Contact us and we’ll get our professional crews out to take care of your dormant prunes.

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Ok let’s dig out our gardening tools and get to work!

Oh you thought I meant outside? Nope not today, it’s too cold! But you can still work on your garden from the comfort of your own home! Head on out to your local library or your favorite book store and thumb through some great gardening books or magazines. Inspiration is the key to success!

There are many ways of collecting data for this year’s garden. You can pull out pages of catalogs, write notes, bookmark favorite websites but a great and easy way to keep all your thoughts together is by using either Pinterest or Houzz. Both of these are great modern visualization tools. They are simple to use and simple to share!

We, as designers, work year-round with our clients to bring their outdoor living space dreams to reality and our designs are driven by our client’s visions. By using these modern tools we can easily communicate our likes, dislikes and inspirations simply by sharing a picture!

So grab your hot cocoa and start visualizing your garden. While you are at it check out our Pinterest and Houzz sites to get your creative juices flowing.

Spring Bulbs

 

 

Putting the garden to bed.

We all have a bedtime routine, well it’s also a great time to establish one for your garden.

We’ve ended this season on a fairly dry note. So it’s important to continue to water new plantings and evergreens well into fall. You don’t need to do it as frequently as summertime, but they do need a good drink before they go completely dormant in the winter. This is also an effective means of minimizing injury to trees and shrubs during the winter. Water sparingly throughout early autumn, and as the leaves begin to fall switch to less frequent, but deeper watering of deciduous trees and evergreens.

It’s also a great time of year to mulch your planting beds. A layer of mulch insulates the ground therefore allowing it to stay frozen, protecting plants from winter freezes, thaws and winds. A steady temperature will keep the plant in dormancy and prevent it from triggering new growth during a brief warm spell. Tender, new growth too soon will just result in more winter die back. Mulching now will also help conserve whatever water is in the soil.

Also don’t forget to take an inventory of your garden. Make notes of what worked and didn’t work. What needs to be divided for spring or moved to another location?  You’ll have plenty of time in the winter to select some fun new plants and add to your amazing garden come spring.

Van Zelst, Inc. Weinberg Residence, Northfield